Menu Content/Inhalt
        Search by country
        
(Currently 113 countries)

Document sans titre

Village near Pariak (south of Bor), Jonglei, South of SudanSmall boat on a lake near Juet, Jonglei, South of Sudan
School in Terakeka (north of Djouba), Central Equatoria, South SudanSmall boat on a lake near Juet, Jonglei, South of Sudan
Dugout Canoe near Juet, Jonglei, South of SudanFarmer camp of cattle near Bor, Jonglei, South of Sudan
Small boat in the middle of the water lily on White Nil swamp near Gwojo-Adung, Central Equatoria, South of SudanCattle camp on the bank of the White Nile near Gwojo-adung, Central Equatoria, South of SudanSunrise at the savanna near Bor, Jonglei, South of Sudan (6° 9
Lacustrine village in the swamps around White Nil, north of Bor, Jonglei, South of Sudan ( 6°31Excavator of the unfinished Jonglei Canal Project, Jonglei, South of  Sudan (7°01’ N, 31°30’ E).Field cultivation near Fanoing, Jonglei, South of Sudan
Dugout Canoe near Juet, Jonglei, South of Sudan ( 6°43Village near Lafon, Eastern Equatoria, South of Sudan ( 5° 5Farmer camp of cattle, north of Bor, Jonglei, South of Sudan
Huts at the edges of White Nil, near Bor, Jonglei, South of SudanVillage eastern of Torit, Eastern Equatoria, South of SudanLacustrine village in the swamps around White Nil, north of Bor, Jonglei, South of Sudan (6°21




Village in the White Nile swamps near Bor, Jonglei, South Sudan (6°22’ N, 31°32’ E).

This region, is inhabited by the Dinkas (instead of using this name given to them by the settlers they prefer to call themselves Jieng) an ethnic group that practices the agro-pastoralism in great extensions of marsh areas, savannah and wooded savannah of the White Nile valley and its tributary, the Bahr el-Ghazal. This part of Africa experienced a series of civil wars, opposing North and South Sudan, formerly protected by the Anglo-Egyptian treaty. The first conflict that occurred in the region, in which half million people died, went on from 1955 to 1972. It ended with a peace agreement signed in Addis-Abeba, which gave relative autonomy to South Sudan. Not quite solved, the war started again in 1983 and went on until 2002, with a series of massacres and hunger, leaving 2 million deaths behind. In 2005 a new agreement was signed foreseeing a period of 6 years of transitory autonomy followed by a self-determination referendum. The referendum occurred in 2011 and more than 98% of the votes were in favour of the secession. The independence of the new state was declared on July 9, 2011. Djouba is the capital city. The Republic of South Sudan was the 193rd recognized state in the UN and the 54th member of the African Union. Today it has a population of over 8 million inhabitants living in a territory of 620.000 km2.

Visit the YAB Gallery for books and signed prints

DatsoGallery Multilingual
By Andrey Datso
Discover the others
Yann Athus-Bertrand's projects
          

All photographs displayed on this website are for personal use only. All rights reserved Yann Arthus-Bertrand ©2018 yannarthusbertrand2.org