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The Corcovado overlooking the city of Rio de Janero, Brazil (22°57’ S, 43°13’ W).Detail of a building in São Paulo, Brazil (23°32’ S, 46°37’ W).Forestry site on the Amazon near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil (3°03’ S, 60°06’ W).
Brasilia, Brazil (15°48’ S, 47°52’ W).Favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (22°56’ S, 43°16’ W)Deforestation in Amazonia, Mato Grosso, Brazil (9°26’ S, 54°43’ W)
Storm over the Amazonian rainforest near Téfé, Amazonas State, Brazil (3°32’ S, 64°53’ W).A storm over the Amazon Rainforest, Amazonas State, Brazil (2°00’ S, 64°00’ W).São Paulo University swimming pool, São Paulo, Brazil (23°32’ S, 46°37’ W).
At Belém, Pará State, Brazil (1°27’ S, 48°29’ W).Meanders in the Amazon River near Manaus, Brazil (3°10’ S, 60°00’ W).Meeting of the waters of the Negro and the Amazon, State of Amazonas, Brazil (3°04’ S, 59°58’ W).
Herd of zebu on a road near Cáceres, Mato Grosso, Brazil (16°05’ S, 57°40’ W).Bird’s eye view of São Paulo, Brazil  (23°32’ S, 46°37’ W).Surfer at Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (22°58’ S, 43°11’ W).
Gold mines near Pocone, Mato Grosso, Brazil (16°15’ S, 56°37’ W).Fazenda (ranch) surrounded by the waters of the Rio Vermelho, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil (17°00’ S, 56°54’ W).Deforestation in Amazonia, Mato Grosso, Brazil (12°38’ S, 60°12’ W)
Favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (22°55’ S, 43°15’ W).Enclosure of cattle close to Cacères, Mato Grosso, Brazil (15°59’ S, 57°42’ W).Herd of Zebu near Cáceres, Mato Grosso, Brazil (16°05’ S, 57°40’ W).
Cows grazing in the Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil (17°36’ S, 57°30’ W).Marsh near Almolar, Panatanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil (19°14’ S, 57°02’ W).Marsh near Almolar, Panatanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil (19°14’ S, 57°02’ W).
Cattle grazing in the Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil (17°36’ S, 57°30’ W). Gold mine of Poconé, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil (16°10’ S, 56°25’ W).Giant Amazon Water Lily (Victoria amazonica), Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil (19°14’ S, 57°02’ W).




Meanders in the Amazon River near Manaus, Brazil (3°10’ S, 60°00’ W).

The Amazon is the world’s biggest river in terms of the size of its basin, which covers almost 2.6 million square miles (7 million km2) of land belonging to seven different Latin American countries. The river allows logging companies to penetrate into the heart of Amazonia, but it is the building of new roads that has really allowed them to intensify their activity and, thus, speed up the deforestation that is threatening not just biodiversity and ecosystems but indigenous people, too. Since 1993, wood certification schemes have been in place to ensure the world’s forests and their inhabitants are protected. Labels such as that given by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) mean that consumers can be sure the wood they buy comes from forests where sustainable logging respects the rights of indigenous people and allows reforesting of felled areas. Well-informed consumers who buy responsibly can thus oblige producer countries to keep a close eye on how their forests are managed.


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